Graphics, Image for Prince Dorus; or, The Romance of the Nose
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Graphics, Image for Prince Dorus; or, The Romance of the Nose
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
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Title:Prince Dorus; or, The Romance of the Nose
Description:Scene from Prince Dorus; or, The Romance of the Nose at the Olympic.
Theatre:Olympic
Source:The Illustrated London News, Dec 28, 1858, p. 513
Review:The Illustrated London News, Dec 28, 1850, p. 513

OLYMPIC.

Mr. Tom Taylor takes the subject of Madame D'Arblay's "Prince Doras" for his Christmas piece—the pet of the good and the prey of wicked fairies.  The latter curse the child in its cradle with a big nose.  Furiosa is the name of the "heldam," whose nasal malediction becomes so inconveniently objective in another.  The consternation of the Royal pa and ma is excessive; but, in the second scene (by which time, with railway speed, the youth has become a man of one-and-twenty), they have got accustomed to the enormity of their son's "prominent feature."  He now advertises for a wife, and receives in reply the portraits of all the princesses in the world—all at least who are marriageable.  The portraits are clairvoyant, and discourse with the lover, who thus holds a chat with the Princess of Mignionette, and subsequently has an interview with the lady herself.  But the nose! She would fly from that.  Pursued, through earth, air, and water, she is at last caught napping by the Prince, who, in stooping to kiss the sleeping beauty, finds his nose too long.  On this discovery depended the spell.  It is made, and the nose sinks from a non-natural to a natural organ of sense.  No longer blind to his own defects, on their removal nothing thenceforth stands in the way of his cherished object.  And thus successfully ends the "Romance of the Nose,"

with a splendid tableau,
The scenes being all in the style of Watteau.

We have engraved the cleverly-managed scene of the interview.

 

The Illustrated London News, Dec 28, 1858, p. 513

 

 

The Illustrated London News, Dec 28, 1858, p. 514

 



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Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
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The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."