Graphics, Image for The Old Love and the New
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Graphics, Image for The Old Love and the New
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
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Title:The Old Love and the New
Description:Scene From the New Comedy of The Old Love and the New, At Drury Lane Theatre.
Theatre:Drury Lane
Source:The Illustrated London News, Jan 18, 1851, p. 45
Review:The Illustrated London News, Jan 18, 1851, pp. 45-46

DRURY LANE.

A sentimental conversational play, in five acts, by Mr. Sullivan, entitled "The Old Love and the New," was produced on Thursday.  The house was, we are happy to say, crowded by a fashionable audience assembled to witness a new drama, on which, probably, the fortunes of the theatrical season depended.  If the production of a meritorious literary composition and the approbation of an intelligent auditory can ensure success, the author and the manager may congratulate themselves on the result of the evening.  From the absence of situations and comic scenes, however, it is somewhat difficult to make the interest of the theme intelligible in recital.  The plot is of the kind that comes out in the dialogue, not in the action; and its value is dependent more on the style in which it is told than on the manner in which it addresses the eye of the spectator.  Its influence lies in the language, which is always good, though seldom brilliant, frequently elegant, and invariably neat.  The turns of fortune in the story depend on the agency of an old maid, Miss Trimmer (Mrs. Ternan), who has become such in consequence of the neglect in early youth of Sir Algernon Courtoun, Bart. (Mr. Cooper), and who, at the opening of the play, deems himself the accepted suitor of one Camilla Haythorn (Mrs. Nisbett).  But the young lady has a lover in the baronet's nephew, Captain Sidney Courtoun (Mr. Anderson), in favour of whom she gives the uncle a refusal This has the operation of depriving the nephew of the uncle's fortune; to restore which, the young lady takes to scheming.  She feigns a passion for Major Stock (Mr. Emery), who is deceived by the ruse, and who has accordingly to bear for the nonce the brunt of the uncle's indignation and her father's disapprobation.  The tables being turned upon the young lady in this direction, and the affair becoming serious, to avoid the consequences, the lovers are compelled to call in the aid of the old maid, who, by making herself known to Sir Algernon, turns all his anger into self-remorse and induces him to sanction their marriage.  The interest of this fable was gradually built up, and the different developments of it contrived with great skill.  The scenery bestowed upon it is highly finished, and one of the scenes, which we have given in the fourth act, is a very splendid and well-set picture.  It is that in which the Major is under the process of being undeceived as to the reality of Camilla's attachment for him.  It is, perhaps, the most exciting portion of the dialogue, and produced considerable merriment.  Mrs. Nisbett acted with care and effect, but, we thought, avoided too much the realizing of the incidents.  This fault may in general be found with the acting; but no doubt it was indulged in by all, from the perception that the work depended, as we have said, on its conversational excellence.  Mr. Anderson had little more to do than to look the lover.  The smallest share of the dialogue fell, perhaps, to his lot.  Mr. Emery had, on the other hand, a somewhat bustling part to sustain and threw some animation into the scenes in which he appeared.  On the fall of the curtain, the author and the performers were called for.  The former bowed his acknowledgments from a private box, and the comedy was announced for repetition until further notice.

 

The Illustrated London News, Jan 18, 1851, p. 45

 

 

The Illustrated London News, Jan 18, 1851, p. 46

 



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Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
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The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."