Graphics, Image for The Corps de Tambours.
Space
Graphics, Image for The Corps de Tambours.
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
Space
Space
Daily Calendar Daily Calendars
Space
Home Editorial Page Authors & Titles Actors & Actresses Music, Song, & Dance Management Bibliography Graphics Gallery Theatre Research Adelphi Today Book Version

HOME

EDITORIAL
PAGE

AUTHORS
& TITLES

ACTORS &
ACTRESSES

MUSIC, SONG,
& DANCE

MANAGEMENT

BIBLIOGRAPHY

GRAPHICS
GALLERY

THEATRE
RESEARCH

ADELPHI
TODAY

BOOK
VERSION

Space
Title:The Corps de Tambours.
Description:M. Jullien's Concert at Drury Lane Theatre.--The Corps de Tambours.
Theatre:Drury Lane
Source:The Illustrated London News, Nov 23, 1850, p. 409
See Source:Go to Source Images (9.0 MB)
Review:The Illustrated London News, Nov 23, 1850, p. 409

M. JULLIEN'S CONCERTS.

The "Great Exhibition Quadrille," at Drury Lane Theatre has proved a great hit as everybody acquainted with M. Jullien's inventive faculties in such pièces de circonstance must have anticipated.  In directing huge masses of executants from whom boisterous effects in broad contrast are to be extracted, in tickling the ears of the miscellaneous public by piquant reiteration of familiar tunes, in happy adaptation of passing events in musical description, M. Jullien has the greatest fertility of conception and facility of execution.  Such compositions, or rather compilations, verging, as they are, on the burlesque, admit of no serious criticism.  Every hearer--be he purist or gent-like--must be amused and even excited at times.  Only conceive Jullien's ordinary orchestra extended and elevated to the very "flies," the rear filled with players in uniform from three military bands (the Royal Artillery, the Coldstream, and the 2nd Life Guards, with their respective masters, Messrs. Collins, Godfrey, and Grattan Cooke), the centre occupied by the drummers of the French National Guards with their Tambour Major, M. Barbier, perched with his golden stick on a raised platform beneath which is the "ruler of the elements," M. Jullien, on his golden throne, and the foreground filled with the stringed instruments!  What a general is required to organize these formidable forces and what a concentration of the entente cordiale to see the French drummers fraternising with our red-coats.  And the Tambour-Major, with his cocked hat placed rectangularly on his Gallic head, how fierce and yet courteous does he look!  With what a graceful jerk does he come down on the concluding rolling chord of the drummers' "beat."  And the "two sticks in waiting," at whose gyrations the executants so obediently play fortissimo or pianissimo--Jullien and Barbier, who, for the Exhibition of 1851, have really made a treaty offensive and defensive, and their united bátons of England and France marshal the orchestra with mighty vigour.  Aladdin, who raised a palace in one night, by the aid of his wonderful lamp, and Mr. Paxton, who is raising a Crystal Palace, with his lamp of knowledge, are as nothing compared with Jullien, who dives into futurity and gives you the "March of All Nations to London."  "The Great City," exclaims M. Jullien's combined orchestra, "which, for the first time, shelters such wonderful masses from all parts of the known world, is as yet tranquil" (at this portion of the quadrille the drums and brass are going in full force), "when at daybreak" (Kœnig's cornet) "the festival is ushered in by the sounding of the chimes of London" (played by Sig. Baldacci on the harmonicon), "echoed far and near from each surrounding belfry: soon the city's in movement” (the stringed instruments), "and the multitudes hasten towards the same goal" (Drury lane Theatre), "all eager to behold the most stupendous realisation of human industry recorded in the history of the globe.  A tremendous shout bursts forth” (the entire orchestra shout hurrah), "and the welcomed nations" (M. Barbier and his 15 drummers), "one and all, join in the glorious cry 'God Save the Queen.'" After this, no wonder Jullien sinks exhausted in his chair of state, and the promenaders encore the anthem.

M. Jullien, to suit the tastes of the various nations, has selected the Russian National Hymn, the Marseillaise, the Song of the Girondins ("Mourir pour la patrie") the Troubadour's air ("Partant pour la Syrie"), the military pas of the French (including Auber's "Pas Redoublé"), the Spanish "Zapatiedo," or clogdance of La Mancha; the "Cachucha" of Andalusia, the Sicilian Serenade, the Neapoleon "Tarantella," the Piedmontese "Monferina," "Rule Britannia," the "Row Polka," Carlotta Grisi's "Truandaise," &c., and all these materials, highly spiced, are served up in an exciting "potage à la Jullien." The enthusiasm of the audiences for this quadrille knows no bounds, and the theatre is nightly filled to overflow.  The soloists deserve especial praise: M. Soualle performs on the "corno-musa," one of the new sax inventions, excellently; the tone partakes of the volume and richness of the clarionet and the bassoon.  Pratten, Collinet, Delavigne, and Lazarus have the flute, flageolet, oboe, and clarionet variations.  Baldacci, as the ringer of the bob-major, and as the castanet player, must be mentioned honourably.  Lerey blows in the monster opheicleide, which makes itself heard; but the huge octo-basso, or colossal double-bass, is not audible as yet: perhaps we may be favoured with a duo between it and the gigantic drum.  The Ciebras tinkle the guitar, and Streather strikes the harp.  Sommer on the euphonican, and Cioffi on the trombone, display striking skill; and Kœnig is, of course, prominent amongst the obligato bits with his cornet.  The drummers are especially noticed in their "roulement serré," pas acceleré, "chamade," chant d'honneur, &c.: their souls are evidently in arms, for their beat is full of crispness and precision.  M. Jullien has appropriated "the all-absorbing subject of the day" most opportunely; his Quadrille will make a great noise for some time to come.



Space
Top Home Editorial Page Daily Calendar Authors & Titles Actors & Actresses Music, Song, & Dance Management Bibliography Graphics Gallery Theatre Research Adelphi Today Book Version Site Map

TOP

HOME

EDITORIAL
PAGE

DAILY
CALENDAR

AUTHORS
& TITLES

ACTORS &
ACTRESSES

MUSIC, SONG,
& DANCE

MANAGEMENT

BIBLIOGRAPHY

GRAPHICS
GALLERY

THEATRE
RESEARCH

ADELPHI
TODAY

BOOK
VERSION

SITE
MAP

Space
Thank you for visiting this site.
Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
Creative Commons License
The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."