Graphics, Image for The Workman of Paris; or, The Drama of the Wine Shop
Space
Graphics, Image for The Workman of Paris; or, The Drama of the Wine Shop
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
Space
Space
Daily Calendar Daily Calendars
Space
Home Editorial Page Authors & Titles Actors & Actresses Music, Song, & Dance Management Bibliography Graphics Gallery Theatre Research Adelphi Today Book Version

HOME

EDITORIAL
PAGE

AUTHORS
& TITLES

ACTORS &
ACTRESSES

MUSIC, SONG,
& DANCE

MANAGEMENT

BIBLIOGRAPHY

GRAPHICS
GALLERY

THEATRE
RESEARCH

ADELPHI
TODAY

BOOK
VERSION

Space
Title:The Workman of Paris; or, The Drama of the Wine Shop
Description:The Workman of Paris; or, The Drama of the Wine Shop. (author unknown, composer M. Artus)  Tableau 8 (James Gates) Quai des Ormes with view of Seine and Paris by moonlight.
1st Performance:Nov 30, 1864
Theatre:Adelphi
Source:The Illustrated London News, Dec 17, 1864, p. 600
See Source:Go to Source Images (8.9 MB)
Review:The Illustrated London News, Dec 17, 1864, p. 600

SCENE FROM "THE WORKMEN OF PARIS."

We have already noticed the new domestic drama of Parisian life, which the management of the Adelphi has borrowed from the Porte St. Martin.  "Les Drames du Cabaret"--a title which might have been translated "Tragedies of the Tap-room"--is designed, like the latest works of Mr. George Cruikshank, as a warning against the vice of drunkenness.  The greatest villain, however, among the dramatis personć is an elderly Dutch merchant, who does not get drunk, though he seduces, betrays, and murders the unwary victims of his machinations; while the honest workman Daubry, who only beats his wife and children after a glass too much, and M. Albert, the dissipated young gentleman who ruins a poor girl as it were inadvertently, when rather over-excited by wine, are represented as fit objects of our sympathy.  The moral would therefore seem to be that habitual intoxication is not the worst of vices after all, but that M. Van Gratz himself, the wicked old rich man of the story, is said to have once got tipsy in his youth and killed the father of Albert in his cups.  The dramatic interest of the piece, with the powerful acting of Mr. Benjamin Webster, will probably continue to draw for many nights a crowded audience who may not care to discuss its moral teaching.  There are two novel and elaborate scenic effects, which greatly add to the attractions of the play.  One of them represents a foundry, or engineer's factory, with all its machinery at work; the other is a view of Paris by moonlight, taking in the Pont Neuf and the Cité, with the towers of Notre Dame in the background.  The reality of this picture is heightened by the introduction of lighted lamps and similar appliances, producing a spectacle which in its kind has not been surpassed.  The engraving we here present gives a fair idea of it.  Mr. Gates is the painter of this scene.



Space
Top Home Editorial Page Daily Calendar Authors & Titles Actors & Actresses Music, Song, & Dance Management Bibliography Graphics Gallery Theatre Research Adelphi Today Book Version Site Map

TOP

HOME

EDITORIAL
PAGE

DAILY
CALENDAR

AUTHORS
& TITLES

ACTORS &
ACTRESSES

MUSIC, SONG,
& DANCE

MANAGEMENT

BIBLIOGRAPHY

GRAPHICS
GALLERY

THEATRE
RESEARCH

ADELPHI
TODAY

BOOK
VERSION

SITE
MAP

Space
Thank you for visiting this site.
Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
Creative Commons License
The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."