Graphics, Image for Queen of the Market
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Graphics, Image for Queen of the Market
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
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Title:Queen of the Market
Description:Scene from the new drama of the "Queen of the Market," by H. C. Coape and Ben Webster at the Adelphi Theatre.  There is also a review of Mephistopheles; or, An Ambassador from Below! by Robert Brough   (April 14, 1852).
1st Performance:Apr 12, 1852
Theatre:Adelphi
Source:The Illustrated London News, Apr 17, 1852, p. 309
See Source:Go to Source Images (8.5 MB)
Review:The Illustrated London News, Apr 17, 1852, p. 310

ADELPHI.

In characterising the same piece here, it cannot be necessary to go into the same detail.  Suffice it to say, that the title adopted is "The Queen of the Market," and the names of the characters differ.  The heroine is here Louise, the wife of Maurice Durand, and is played by Mrs. Keeley with all her usual power.  The Herculean Syndic (Blaise Lefort) is grotesquely impersonated by Paul Bedford.  The story being more compactly told increases in interest, though the scenic effects are, of course, inferior in extent and ingenuity.

Our illustration is taken from the version exhibited at this house, and represents the scene in which the supposed Marquis is compelled to receive the bouquet from Louise, and give to her the customary kiss in return.  The embarrassment caused by this incident is of prominent dramatic interest and was beautifully expressed by Mrs. Keeley and Mr. Lambert.  The position of Blaise Lefort, also, was most amusingly exaggerated by Paul Bedford.  The public will no doubt be curious to compare the different effect of the same piece at such disproportionate lengths as eight acts and three; moreover, each version is good, we may predict a considerable run for both.

On Wednesday, another addition was made to the Easter attractions, one of a peculiar structure, and designed to illustrate the versatility of Miss Woolgar.  The author has resorted to a tale of Machiavelli, and has confided to the actress the mission that the former had entrusted to the fiend Belfegor.  The title of the piece is "Mephistopheles," and summons up associations with the genius of Goethe and his wonderful "Faust."  There is much of his spirit in this drama. The infernal powers are much distressed to learn whether matrimonial squabbles are the fault of husband or wife.  To ascertain the fact Mephistopheles proceeds to effect his incarnation in both characters--the first a doating boor and the other a meek and piously-educated lady; the former he converts into a brute, the latter into a fashionable termagant.  The moral we suppose is that the fault in question is sometimes the man's and sometimes the woman's.  No very satisfactory conclusion this, but eminently practical.  In it, however, we may recognise the Mephistophelian principle--the Goethean sarcasm.  The dramatic ground, however, is as convincing as the moral one is unstable.  The variety of assumptions, altogether five, realised by Miss Woolgar with the most artistic facility, demonstrates beyond all doubt the comprehensiveness of her powers.  The whole action is comprised in one set scene; and the charm of the performance lies in the apparent completeness of the entire work.  As an elegant vaudeville it merits the success it achieved.  The piece is written by Mr. R. B. Brough, one of the Brothers Brough, whose productions we have on many occasions had the pleasure of commending.



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Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
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The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."