Graphics, Image for The Mysterious Stranger; founded upon Satan; ou, Le Diable a Paris
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Graphics, Image for The Mysterious Stranger; founded upon Satan; ou, Le Diable a Paris
THE   ADELPHI   THEATRE   CALENDAR
A Record of Dramatic Performances at a Leading Victorian Theatre

Formerly the Sans Pareil (1806-1819), later the Adelphi (1819-1900)
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Title:The Mysterious Stranger; founded upon Satan; ou, Le Diable a Paris
Description:The Mysterious Stranger, founded upon Satan; ou, Le Diable à Paris.  Written by Charles Selby.  Mme. Céleste played the Mysterious Stranger.  James Hudson played the Count.  Mlle. de Nantelle was Miss Emma Harding.
1st Performance:Oct 29, 1844
Theatre:Adelphi
Source:The Illustrated London News, Nov 9, 1844, p. 300
Review:The Illustrated London News, Nov 9, 1844, p. 300

SCENE FROM THE "MYSTERIOUS STRANGER."

The accompanying sketch embodies one of the most effective scenes of this spirited piece.  The Satanic tormenter of the puzzled Count Beausoleil (Mr. Hudson) has fully performed all his predictions.  The Count has lost his fortune, and with his fortune his friends and his mistress.  On a rumour, however, that his runaway banker has been arrested, his mistress returns, for there is then a chance of the fortune being recovered, explains away her desertion, and renews her vows of fidelity.  At this nick of time his mysterious persecutor enters, declares all the lady has said to be false, and proves it by putting the Count into a closet, declaring that the banker has escaped beyond the possibility of arrest, that the fortune is lost, and that he himself, being rich beyond calculation, will marry the lady himself; and she consents, to the great horror of the Count, who rushes forward maddened, seizes the pistols from the case his visitor has brought, with an offer of being his second in the duel that must inevitably take place with his dearest friend, for whom his mistress has deserted him, and fires!  As the weapons had probably been prepared for such a catastrophe, by the agent who brought them, he stands in the doorway harmless, thus again turning a natural cause into a proof of his supernatural power; the cleverness with which this is done throughout is the great merit of the piece.

 

The Illustrated London News, Nov 9, 1844, p. 299

 

 

The Illustrated London News, Nov 9, 1844, p. 300

 



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Copyright © 1988, 1992, 2013 by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.
Originally published by Greenwood Press as The Sans Pareil Theatre 1806-1819, Adelphi Theatre 1819-1850: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers, 1988, and The Adelphi Theatre 1850-1900: An Index to Authors, Titles, Performers and Management, 1992.
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The Adelphi Theatre Calendar revised, reconstructed and amplified.  Copyright © 2013, by Alfred L. Nelson, Gilbert B. Cross, Joseph Donohue.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, with the exception of graphics from The Clip Art Book, edited by Gerard Quinn and published by Crescent in 1990.  These images are reproduced in accord with the publisher’s note, which states "The Clip Art Book is a new compilation of illustrations that are in the public domain.  The individual illustrations are copyright free and may be reproduced without permission or payment.  However, the selection of illustrations and their layout is the copyright of the publisher, so that one page or more may not be photocopied or reproduced without first contacting the publishers."